Archivos Mensuales: agosto 2014

New Data Safety Service for Inmarsat FleetBroadband

Supported by European Space Agency (ESA) funding, Inmarsat’s forthcoming Maritime Safety Data Service (MSDS) for FleetBroadband, delivers an increased data capability over the Inmarsat-4 network, including the Alphasat satellite, providing global coverage and the same reliability of over 99.9 per cent associated with the Inmarsat network.

Added Features

MSDS will continue to offer distress alerting, priority messaging and SafetyNET safety information broadcasts, but also deliver greater data capability than is currently available with Inmarsat C safety services.

Other additional features include:
*Content-rich applications
*Chart updates
*Ability to co-ordinate rescue operations by email as well as voice calls
*Telemedicine
*Distress chat – an instantaneous chatroom function between multiple vessels and maritime rescue coordination centres
*A new-style maritime safety terminal (MST) developed by Cobham SATCOM
*All data accessed over MSDS to be captured and stored at new servers.

Peter Blackhurst, Head of Maritime Safety Services at Inmarsat states, "Inmarsat has set the standard for maritime safety since its inception in 1979 and we remain the only satellite operator to gain International Maritime Organization (IMO) compliance with our legacy Inmarsat C and Fleet 77 safety services.

"The introduction of new data safety services over FleetBroadband has been one of our long term goals and the new system, together with Voice Distress, will ensure that we can continue to enhance safety communications and help save lives at sea not only for now but long into the future.

"We are currently working closely with the IMO to bring our new service to market with the aim of eventually gaining SOLAS approval for both FleetBroadband data and voice Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) services."

"The satellite business doesn’t stand still. Developments are going to continue to enhance capabilities month on month, let alone year on year, so we should expect further enriched safety services in the future," Peter added.

"Everything comes to its life’s end and while the Inmarsat C service is still very competent and it will continue well into the 2020s and beyond, despite being over 20 years old, we would ultimately like to see MSDS accepted as the natural successor to deliver SafetyNET."

The launch date for MSDS is subject to the IMO approval process for SOLAS ships but it is anticipated that non-SOLAS versions will be available well in advance, with a prototype expected in 2014 and a ready-to-market terminal planned for Q2 2015.

Please visit Inmarsat’s Maritime safety page for further information: http://www.inmarsat.com/service/maritime-safety/

IMB: Guard Against Threat of Cyber Attack

The International Maritime Bureau (IMB) is calling for vigilance in the maritime sector as it emerges that shipping and the supply chain is the ‘next playground for hackers’.

IMB said, "Recent events have shown that systems managing the movement of goods need to be strengthened against the threat of cyber-attacks.

"It is vital that lessons learnt from other industrial sectors are applied quickly to close down cyber vulnerabilities in shipping and the supply chain."

The threat of cyber-attacks on the sector have intensified in the past few months, with cyber security experts and the media alike warning of the dangers posed by criminals targeting carriers, ports, terminals and other transport operators.

They argue that while IT systems have become more sophisticated and thus enabling companies to better protect themselves against fraud and theft, it has also left them more vulnerable to ‘cyber criminals’.

Speaking at the TOC Container Supply Chain Europe Conference in London recently, TT Club’s insurance claims expert Mike Yarwood said, "We see incidents which at first appear to be a petty break-in at office facilities. The damage appears minimal – nothing is physically removed."

He added; "More thorough post incident investigations however reveal that the ‘thieves’ were actually installing spyware within the operator’s IT network.".

Yarwood said that more commonly targets are individuals’ personal devices where cyber security is less adequate.

Hackers often make use of social networks to target truck drivers and operational personnel who travel extensively to ascertain routing and overnight parking patterns. The criminals were looking to extract information such as release codes for containers from terminal facilities or passwords to discover delivery instructions.

"In instances discovered to date, there has been an apparent focus on specific individual containers in attempts to track the units through the supply chain to the destination port. Such systematic tracking is coupled with compromising the terminal’s IT systems to gain access to, or generate release codes for specific containers. Criminals are known to have targeted containers with illegal drugs in this way; however such methods also have greater scope in facilitating high value cargo thefts and human trafficking," Yarwood revealed.

Whilst it is difficult to get hold of exact numbers and statistics, the risks should not be underestimated, and in June the US Government Accountability Office warned about the possible threats to US ports.

In a stinging report, the organisation said that the actions taken by the Department of Homeland Security and two component agencies, the US Coast Guard and Federal Emergency Management Agency, as well as other federal agencies, to address cybersecurity in the maritime port environment have been limited.

KPMG warns that hackers are the new open sea pirates. Wil Rockall a director in the organisation’s cyber security team highlights that the cyber security of maritime control systems are controlled by engineers and not chief information security officers (CISOs) or chief information officers (CIOs). Lacking security controls, these systems are vulnerable to hackers.

"Most ports and terminals are managed by industrial control systems which have, until very recently, been left out of the CIO’s scope. Historically, this security has not been managed by company CISOs and maritime control systems are very similar.

"As a consequence, the improvements that many companies have made to their corporate cyber security to address the change in the threat landscape over the past three to five years have not been replicated in these environments. Instead engineers have often been left to implement and manage these systems – people who focus normally on optimising processes efficiency and safety, not cyber and security risks. It has meant that many companies and their clients are sailing into uncharted waters when they come to try and manage these risks," he said.

Rockall added; "We have found that one of the main blockers in improving this is a real translation problem when corporate IT security teams attempt to impose their standards on industrial control systems or maritime control systems. KPMG’s work with the operator of one of the largest fleets of crude oil and oil products tankers and liquefied natural gas carriers in the world, found that bridging that gap and coming up with pragmatic solutions to improve industrial control systems security without compromising process efficiency or safety, are vital to the success of industrial control systems cyber risk management."

ConnectFest Returns to METS

NMEA 2000 network standard goes live to demonstrate how easily it operates

The National Marine Electronics Association (NMEA) will once again demonstrate to visitors at METS, the Marine Equipment Trade Show held in Amsterdam, how the global network communications standard NMEA 2000 works. Called ConnectFest, the free live demonstration will take place Wednesday, November 19, from 2-4 p.m. at the Amsterdam RAI event center. METS,a trade show serving the recreational marine industry, opens its three-day run on Tuesday, November 18.

NMEA 2000 is the CAN-based open industry network standard that permits different brands of electrical and electronic equipment to communicate seamlessly with each other. Electronic devices can be added to or removed from an NMEA 2000 network without any downtime or any impact on the overall operation of the system.

"METS has again invited NMEA to produce an NMEA 2000 ConnectFest," said NMEA Technical Director Steve Spitzer. "This is an important event for NMEA 2000 manufacturers and for the international attendees at METS."

During the demonstration, several manufacturers will connect their equipment to the NMEA 2000 backbone, a lightweight cable, to show the simplicity of adding or removing devices and to demonstrate their interoperability on the network.

Spitzer will introduce the session with an overview of NMEA 2000 and be there, along with the manufacturers, to answer questions ranging from costs and installation to configurability, scalability, and expansion of the system to meet future needs. He will also discuss several new PGNs, or network messages, that NMEA has created, including PGNs for watermakers, power generation, power distribution, man overboard, and AIS-automatic identification systems.

In past years, ConnectFest ran continuously during one day of the show. Visitors, either individually or in small groups, stopped by randomly to watch and ask questions. This year the schedule is different.

"We listened to input from visitors and participants over the last two years and have made adjustments to the ConnectFest," said Spitzer. "Instead of an all-day ConnectFest, we have shortened the hours to attract a more concentrated and focused attendance. Only NMEA 2000 Certified products or NMEA 2000 Certified Products Pending will be able to participate."

nmea.org

SevenCs Debuts Aviation Module for ECDIS Kernel

The new 5.18 version of the EC 2007 software development kit (SDK) from SevenCs is available for both Windows and Linux applications, updated to now include support of Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED), ARINC 424 Aviation Charts and new development environment Visual Studio 2010 32/64bit.

The EC2007 ECDIS Kernel assists OEMs to develop a wide range of marine chart display application, such as ECDIS, WECDIS, VTS, Inland ECDIS, ECS, PPU and tactical consoles. It includes more than 1,000 functions for chart display, chart handling and navigation.
Its use reduces product development costs and risks and facilitates the effort associated with keeping up-to-date with complex chart display standards.

Björn Röhlich, Sales Director of SevenCs commented, "The new aviation module allows our clients to fulfill the operational and tactical requirements of the navies worldwide. Joint operations between air force, army and navy require a detailed chart presentation to allow an optimum allocation of forces and situational awareness."

sevencs.com

Argentina. Buenos Aires avanza en el proyecto de estatización parcial de puertos

Tags: estatización parcial de puertos, argentina

El vicegobernador bonaerense ratificó que continúa trabajando en un proyecto de ley que permita la estatización de los puertos que funcionan en la provincia "para que el 30 % de la carga esté en manos de empresas argentinas y no por multinacionales”.

“El objetivo de la propuesta es recuperar parte del dinero que esas empresas hoy tributan en sus países de origen para los fondos de la provincia, con el fin de amplificar el presupuesto educativo en un valor que, se estima, ronda los 30.000 millones de pesos”, explicó Gabriel Mariotto.

El debate de la iniciativa se da en el marco de la realización de los Foros de Debate Educativo en territorio provincial en los que se busca la jerarquización de los institutos de formación docente, la creación de Centros Regionales de Educación Superior y reformas en las elecciones de los Consejos Escolares para así declarar la educación como derecho público esencial.

“Es decir que, además de recuperar el control de nuestros puertos y que el Estado adquiera un rol protagónico en la administración de la economía bonaerense, el proyecto tiende a concebir una alternativa para generar ingresos destinados a mejorar el estado de las escuelas, los salarios de los docentes y los requerimientos de equipamiento y socioeducativos que implican una educación inclusiva y de calidad”, sostuvo el titular del Senado provincial.

Sostuvo que “tenemos que ir a buscar el nicho de esos 8.000 millones de dólares que se nos van para volcar en logística y volcar en educación, digo logística porque hoy los consorcios portuarios recaudan y ellos solos deciden a donde volcar esa recaudación”.

La provincia de Buenos Aires posee puertos en San Nicolás, Campana, Zárate, La Plata, General Lavalle, Mar del Plata, Quequén y Bahía Blanca.

Fuente: telam.com.ar